Flower Planter Two

A second village flower planter has been installed on Leamington Road.
This is a joint project between the Countryside and Website Action Groups after it was raised by residents in the Parish Plan. The Countryside Action Group will now plant the large box which will help add a welcoming entrance to the village. Signs promoting the village website will be added at a later date by the Website Action Group.

Flower planter being put into place by local volunteers

Flower planter being put into place by local volunteers


 

Resident Discount For Ryton Pools Annual Car Park Pass

Ryton Pools LogoDo you use Ryton Pools? Did you know you can buy an annual car parking pass rather than pay each time you go? And even better, if you are a resident of Ryton-on-Dunsmore you can get that pass at a discount rate – half price.
The Country Park can sell you a barrier parking permit for £36 which runs for 12 months from the day of purchase but the Parish Office can sell you a permit that runs from April 2016 through to March 2017 for just £18 (further discounts for disabled badge holders at £14.50), so apply now and enjoy a whole year’s access to Ryton Pools. These reduce rate permits will be available until September 2016.
Complete the application form and deliver it to the Parish Clerk at the Village Hall (there is a letter box) with a cheque payable to “Ryton-on-Dunsmore Parish Council” and you will be sent a permit to access the car park.
If you have a expired permit then you can claim back your £5 deposit as the new permits do not require a deposit.

Wassailing At Ryton Community Orchard

Community OrchardWhy not come along to this year’s annual Wassail at the Ryton Community Orchard.
Initially we meet at the Blacksmith’s Arms at 6:00pm for a procession to the orchard at 6:30pm.
It is traditional to dress up; Top Hats, Bowler hats or hats decorated with ivy or mistletoe, but this is optional. Children may dress up as they wish.
Please bring noise making equipment – saucepan, rattle, anything that will make a noise and torches or lanterns and please wear sensible shoes.
For more information on what a Wassail is, then Wikipedia is a good start, where it explains that ‘wassail‘ is from the old english “wæs hæl”, which means “be you healthy”, but more specifically that it relates to apples and cider. It seems that the purpose of ‘wassailing‘ is to awaken the apples trees and scare away the evil spirits, hence why the details of the event ask you to bring along anything that makes a noise.
Wassailing is a an English traditional ceremony that was most common in the southern cider producing counties of England that involves singing and drinking to the health of the apples trees for their forthcoming season and as such usually takes place as part of the Twelfth Night (after Christmas) celebrations.
The Project Britain website details a little more about wassailing and mentions it as one of many other Twelfth Night celebrations.

Introduction to Beekeeping

Bee Training
Have you ever fancied bee keeping? The Warwick and Leamington Beekeepers are providing an ‘Introduction to Beekeeping’ Course to be held at the National Beekeeping Centre, Stoneleigh Park over 6 weekly consecutive evening sessions starting on Monday February 8th 2016 from 7pm – 9pm (preceded by tea/coffee at 6.30pm).
The course costs £65 and includes theory and practical sessions, assembling hives, and learning how to source and handle bees enjoyably and safely, in readiness for keeping bees later that year. Places fill up fast, so please book early. For more details, or to book a place, visit their website.
The Warwick and Leamington Beekeepers are a branch of Warwickshire Beekeepers’ Association (WBKA), which itself is affiliated to the British Beekeepers’ Association (BBKA).

Steetley Meadows Annual Update

2013 has seen many people enjoying Steetley Meadows, especially in the better summer weather that we enjoyed this year. The meadows have looked lovely and the trustees would especially like to thank Mr David Kenning for all his voluntary work to maintain and improve the meadows, and to thank Mr Ted Howard for all his hard work. We are very grateful to Mr Simon Miller who kindly audits our accounts.
WoodpeckerHighlights in the meadow this year have been the green woodpeckers, the largest of our British woodpeckers. They can often be seen on the ground feeding with their long tongues on their favourite food, ants.
The Countryside Action Group held a bat walk in the meadows and the group of about 25 people used bat detectors to listen to the bats, including pipistrelles and identified them from their sounds. Powerful lights allowed us to observe Daubenton’s bats hunting for insects over the river.
The Countryside Stewardship Scheme has changed this year and this will result in changes to the management of the meadows, with wider uncut strips along the edges of fields and fewer paths as required by the stewardship agreement management plan. It also entails a reduction in income for the maintenance of the meadows.
The Severn Trent Field at the end of Redland Lane is in the process of being purchased by the Parish Council and this land will eventually be managed by Ryton Conservation Trust.
We invite you to take a stroll down to the Meadows, a good way to walk off some of those extra calories from Christmas! To find them go down Church Road, then along Redland lane where you will find 35 acres of meadow and woodland, part of which is a site of special scientific interest. We do ask all our visitors to take away any litter and clear up after their dogs.

Can you help?

The trust is always very grateful for offers of help, particularly in view of the acquisition of the additional field. There are footpaths to be mowed, brambles to be cut back, nettles and weeds to be strimmed. Even an hour can make a difference, so if you have some spare time and would like to help, please get in touch with one of the trustees (Ian Grimes, Chair, 02476 303277).
The trustees would like to offer Season’s Greetings and a happy and healthy 2014 to all our visitors.
Ian Grime, Rod Crosbie, Carolyn Reily, Martin Nobes, Richard Ridges

Wassailing in Ryton

Community OrchardWhy don’t you come and join us for a wassailling event at the Ryton Community Orchard this weekend, Saturday 11th January. Initially meeting at the Blacksmith’s Arms at 6:00pm for a procession to the orchard at 6:30pm.
When I was asked to advertise this event on the website I thought “what is a wassail?”. So I looked it up.
Wikipedia was a good start, where it explains that ‘wassail‘ is from the old english “wæs hæl”, which means “be you healthy”, but more specifically that it relates to apples and cider. It seems that the purpose of ‘wassailing‘ is to awaken the apples trees and scare away the evil spirits, hence why the details of the event ask you to bring along anything that makes a noise.
Wassailing is a an English traditional ceremony that was most common in the southern cider producing counties of England that involves singing and drinking to the health of the apples trees for their forthcoming season and as such usually takes place as part of the Twelfth Night (after Christmas) celebrations.
The Project Britain website details a little more about wassailing and mentions it as one of many other Twelfth Night celebrations.
So, don your ceremonial hat (holly and/or ivy seems traditional) and bring something to make a noise with and join us at the Blacksmiths Arms this Saturday (11th January) at 6:00 pm for a very different yet traditional experience.